The Public Speaker

"We live in an age of sound bites, and there is something about learning how to speak effectively and in small ways that is important. Say big things in small ways."

NPR creative director Liz Danzico on The Great Discontent. Pair with Neil deGrasse Tyson on the art of the soundbite

Legendary anthropologist Margaret Mead once wrote:

If one cannot state a matter clearly enough so that even an intelligent twelve-year-old can understand it, one should remain within the cloistered walls of the university and laboratory until one gets a better grasp of one’s subject matter.

Previous TGD interviews have included Debbie MillmanAustin KleonJohn Maeda, and yours truly.

(via explore-blog)

      Min / Max Note Taking for Conferences

The Toastmaster year is just getting started and the first conference is a few months away (unless you’re lucky enough to be headed for the international convention next month), but here are a few ideas to help you make the most of those events.

"Language, that most human invention, can enable what, in principle, should not be possible. It can allow all of us, even the congenitally blind, to see with another person’s eyes."
Oliver Sacks
Worth considering, but here for the idea, not the link to the Amazon site. I watch Scott’s posts regularly at Twitter, and have ben thinking for a while that I should work through his book. Has anyone else got an opinion on Confessions of a Public Speaker?

International Working Out Loud Week

International Working Out Loud Week is happening right now is now. Here’s the idea— 1) do something 2) write what you did on an unfeasibly large post-it note 3) attach to your office wall 4) take a photo of it 5) tweet it with the hashtags #wolyo #wolweek If it doesn’t already seem like a good idea, poke around Austin Kleon’s Show Your Work site at Pinterest. Here’s the idea for us. Toastmasters do a lot of interesting and important things that might benefit other Toastmasters and their communities at large, but don’t, I think, spend as much time talking about it as they might. If they did, they might build better relationships among Toastmasters and generate more interest in our organization. Twitter works; so do Google+ and blogs. I wanted to take advantage of the World Cup as a marketing opportunity for Toastmasters, so I made a flyer, posted it to my personal web site, the District 29 Wordpress and Twitter accounts, Flipboard, and RebelMouse. I think there’s something to be gained by Working Out Loud; can I see something you’re working on? 


Here’s more support for the idea from Denise Graveline: “If you want to silence yourself, failing to publish your presentations is a good way to start.” And you’ve already thought to look for Toastmasters speeches on YouTube, haven’t you?
"Talking is something you can’t do judiciously unless you keep in practice."

Dashiell Hammett, The Maltese Falcon.

Hammett, who was born today in 1894, is widely regarded as one of the finest mystery writers of all time and was called the dean of the ‘hard-boiled’ school of detective fiction.

(via vintageanchorbooks)