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What will the presentations of the future look like?

Opinions here are all challenging. Check out

Nolan Haims (“Faster, shorter, fewer words”)
Gavin McMahon (“We engage our audiences, using smart phones and tablets”)
Matt Stevenson (“In the future, our guess is that more presentations will be given virtually than in an actual space, and more than 50% of A-grade presentations will be controlled via mobile device.”)
Gary Hirsch (“Presenters will assess the needs of the audience in real time at the beginning of the presentation and adjust the content in real time to meet these needs.”)
Brad Robertson (“Presentations will be iterative. I present something, you give me some feedback, I re-present. Like a conversation. And shorter!”)

What do you think? How are you preparing?

Ahem, Ummm, Well ...

There’s a fine article about Toastmasters in today’s New York Times. How will you use it in your club?

November 19th, 2013 marks the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. It’s one of the most iconic speeches in American history, but in 1863, it got decidedly mixed reviews – one newspaper even called it “silly, flat and dishwatery.” So how did it become one of the most famous speeches in the United States? This episode of BackStory explores the evolution of an icon, and asks, more generally, what kinds of speeches – and speakers – endure in American history.

From the fiery sermons of traveling preachers in the 18th century to the teleprompted prime-time addresses of presidents today, we’ll look at how audiences’ expectations of orators have shifted, and ask why some speeches loom so much larger — or smaller — in our memory than they did in their own times.

For more on the guests and stories featured in this episode, and for an array of resources on oratory in the United States, check out BackStory’s website: http://backstoryradio.org/?p=11413

Resonate

Nancy Duarte’s Resonate is available on the web at no cost.It’s a great resource.

"When people talk listen completely. Don’t be thinking what you’re going to say. Most people never listen. Nor do they observe. You should be able to go into a room and when you come out know everything that you saw there and not only that. If that room gave you any feeling you should know exactly what it was that gave you that feeling. Try that for practice. When you’re in town stand outside the theatre and see how the people differ in the way they get out of taxis or motor cars. There are a thousand ways to practice. And always think of other people."

The King George Toastmasters Club has chartered, and these pictures from the chartering party shows they know how to do things right. The King George Toastmasters Club has chartered, and these pictures from the chartering party shows they know how to do things right.

The King George Toastmasters Club has chartered, and these pictures from the chartering party shows they know how to do things right.

Billy Collins welcomed August on The Writer’s Almanac with”Still Life” by Carl Dennis, which contains these lines

The light from the window’s angled.The sun’s moving on. That’s why the peopleWho live in the house are missing.They’re all outside enjoying the light that’s left them.

There’s lots of great summer weather to enjoy yet, but Toastmasters need to be busy in August, too. Among the things you can take advantage of
Smedley Award incentives to help you build membership. There’s more at the District 29 site.
The International Convention. You can follow convention news by tracking hashtag #TIConv13 on Twitter. Be sure to let your club know about the results of the business meeting (we’ll have new International Directors and perhaps changes to club governance).
Plan a great club contest and get ready for your area and division contests and District Conference.
Put the finishing touches on your Distinguished Club  Plan and keep making progress on it.

Billy Collins welcomed August on The Writer’s Almanac with”Still Life” by Carl Dennis, which contains these lines

The light from the window’s angled.
The sun’s moving on. That’s why the people
Who live in the house are missing.
They’re all outside enjoying the light that’s left them.

There’s lots of great summer weather to enjoy yet, but Toastmasters need to be busy in August, too. Among the things you can take advantage of

  • Smedley Award incentives to help you build membership. There’s more at the District 29 site.
  • The International Convention. You can follow convention news by tracking hashtag #TIConv13 on Twitter. Be sure to let your club know about the results of the business meeting (we’ll have new International Directors and perhaps changes to club governance).
  • Plan a great club contest and get ready for your area and division contests and District Conference.
  • Put the finishing touches on your Distinguished Club  Plan and keep making progress on it.